You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Apple’ tag.

Like many if not most New Yorkers I tend to breeze through the city “in the zone”.

Laser-focused on finding the path of least resistance to my destination.

Blocking out the city itself with shades on my face.

Deadening it’s uglier sounds via my trusty little white iPod noise-canceling headphones, tucked firmly in my ears.

So why, out of all the people to choose from, do tourists constantly choose ME to ask directions from?

Yanked from my zen-zone by a tap on the shoulder, I’ll turn to see an unfamiliar face, earnestly mouthing… something… important?

I deliberately remove one of my earphones, and say “wha?”

What I don’t say is “…have you NEVER seen an iPod ad? With the dark silhouette with the stark white IV infusing it with all-consuming audio loveliness?”

It’s all good. I don’t mind. And I always help.

But, why me?

Advertisements

Spaces is one of the coolest features of Leopard. In theory.

The way it works is you can create a virtual “grid” where you have several, identical “desktops” with different programs “assigned” to each.

You can either assign them permanently, or simply drag them between the Spaces as you see fit.

For instance, you can have the Web and iTunes in Space #1.
And when you want to do some Flash, or Photoshop just switch to, say, Space #2.
Or, “Word processing and presentations”? Jump to Space #3.
Ripping a DVD? Head on over to Space #5.

And so on. It makes a ton of sense. It’s a beautifully simple concept.
The problem is it doesn’t really work.

First of all, the major 3rd party apps Adobe’s CS3, and Microsoft’s Office 2008 (which I already addressed, here) simply don’t “play” well with Spaces. Nor do many others.

What happens is when you switch back and forth betweenst Spaces the apps get all wiggy. Their windows get mixed up, wonky, and greyed-out. Log-in screens and palettes get scattered between the Spaces, too. And you can’t get them back together again without restarting the program(s).

And, surprisingly, Apple’s own apps aren’t much better.
The main menu bar at the top of the screen often says “Safari”, which is in space #1, when you’re in Space #4 using FontBook.

And God help you if you like to use any of OSX’s other awesome features, like Expose, or the standard “TAB” to switch between apps, or “H” to “hide” apps… it gets even dicier.

Sometimes apps disappear completely.

Of course the larger problem here is Apple’s trademark “no comment”. Because although both Microsoft and Adobe have acknowledged the issue, they have both pointed their fingers squarely at Spaces, and Apple.

Not much of a surprise.

But Apple needs to step up here.

Why? Because it’s their operating system. And they have a duty to make sure it not only does what they say it does, but also play well with at LEAST the other big dogs in the park.

After all, isn’t that what separates them from Windows?

They need to acknowledge the issue exists, pronto, and then fix it on their end. Again, pronto.
And then help the Devs fix it on their end.

Yesterday.

Regardless of who’s fault it is, the fact remains that Spaces doesn’t work as-advertised. Despite several updates of Leopard, and both CS3 and Office 2008.

And message boards across teh internets are strewn with questions upon questions about these exact issues. All with ZERO answers.

Everyone’s repeatedly hoping that the “next update” will fix this. Finger’s crossed.
But help never comes.

Thousands and thousands of loyal customers are simply “dealing with it”.

This is unacceptable. Buts (surprise) if it got more press… it will get fixed.

I’m doing my part. Now for MacWorld, Mac Addict, Computerworld, Cnet, etc, et all.

Guys?

-e

Instead of calling Apple Computer’s Technical support number:

1-800-275-2273

I mistakenly dialed:

1-800-278-2273

…and, apparently, there are “Hot and Horny Singles” just waiting to take my call. At first I thought it was a new Apple marketing campaign. But, fortunately (or, unfortunately?) that was not the case.

LOL.

e